Thursday, November 30, 2006

Slow News Day Poll

We seem to be talking about presidential candidates lately, and unless you want to talk about how Jodi Rell was nearly stuck in traffic then there's not much else going on in state today. That said:

So. Hillary?
Gah!
Meh.
Yay!
Who?
  
Free polls from Pollhost.com

10 comments:

cgg said...

I saw Dodd at the end of an episode of Frontline yesterday. He was talking about credit card reform, and for the first time I felt a sort of Presidential vibe about him.

No, Seriously. I can't believe I'm saying this but maybe he has a chance.

Genghis Conn said...

I don't know. He's a good speaker and all, but I just can't take his candidacy seriously. I don't know why that is.

cgg said...

Which is saying something because I think you take his candidacy more seriously than most in CT.

cgg said...

How many people of you who voted "yay" are Republicans?

disgruntled_republican said...

I was honest and voted GAH!

Anonymous said...

Which response means "fear and loathing"?

Anonymous said...

go mccain!!

Anonymous said...

I don't know what those options mean.

Anonymous said...

On an unrelated subject: At work a fellow employee saw a book on my desk about the election of 1876. This person
had never heard of Rutherford B. Hayes or Samuel Tilden. Needless to say I was shocked. Am I a snob or should I be shocked? I mean this ought to be basic American History every American should know correct??

The Phantom...

Eddie said...

Phantom -- by coincidence, I just finished reading a book about Rutherford B. Hayes (the one in the New York Times 150-page biographies series). Why your co-worker never heard of the guy?

(1) A lot of people tune out on history. Don't ask me why, but they do.
(2) U.S. History class was one of the few things I actually liked about high school, but I don't remember learning a whole lot about that time period. My teacher didn't avoid the seamy side of American history, and 1865-1900 was full of seams: corrupt, angry, violent, and relatively deficient in Lincoln- or Roosevelt-level "great Americans" that idealistic young people could relate to. If anything, I got it about the telegraph and the transcontinental railroad, but that was about it.