Wednesday, November 22, 2006

No Special Session

Older news, but worth mentioning:
House Democrats on Monday ruled out a special legislative session to take up energy legislation, choosing instead to schedule a public hearing before the end of the year.
[...]
Lawmakers believe the state needs at least 500 to 750 megawatts of additional power and are considering allowing the state's two major electricity distributors -- Connecticut Light & Power and United Illuminating -- to produce that power.

Perhaps energy will be taken up during the next session. With rising electric rates, it should be.

Source
"House Democrats scrap special session on energy." Associated Press 20 November, 2006.

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Every time I cross the Q bridge and see the Smokestacks spewing smoke while the tidal flow of the Quinnipiac river rips past I wonder just how stupid a people we are.

Anonymous said...

What you don't understand is not the pollution but the fact that you are being ripped off. Ask what Wallingford pays for power.

Anonymous said...

The legislators should cut the taxes associated with the energy bills!

LitchfieldAngelina said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

I'd like to see energy taxes assessed on a demand pricing schedule, i.e., higher taxes for power in peak periods and lower taxes for low-demand periods. I'd also like to see the guzzlers pay a higher tax on excess use. All those 6,000 sq. ft. McMansions in Fairfield County with central air should pay a higher energy tax.

Anonymous said...

Is it me, or does anyone else think these utility companies are 'monopolies' violating the anti-trust laws?

What does the answer woman, Jodie Rell, think? She does think, doesn't she?

Is she going to fix the problem like she fixed all our transportation problems?

Anonymous said...

What is the super majority party going to propose? It really doesn't matter what Rell thinks or does.

Anonymous said...

" I'd also like to see the guzzlers pay a higher tax on excess use. All those 6,000 sq. ft. McMansions in Fairfield County with central air should pay a higher energy tax."

They already do, it is called a higher electric bill. Goes along with the higher property taxes paid too.

No class envy here eh?

Anonymous said...

anon 11:05,
First of all, property taxes are not higher in the richer towns in CT.

Secondly, you seem to be missing the point entirely as it relates more to supply and demand. Investment (read usage) in energy, like every commodity, has a direct impact on the costs to every other user of that commodity. If there was a greater incentive to conserve, then that would benefit everybody. And when people can afford to pay a premium for a commodity, and are willing to do so out of convenience, no matter what the cost, then increased taxes for those who have chosen to be gluttonous would allow for investment in other energy solutions.

I believe I have made this as simple as possible, but if not, please let me know and I can dumb it down even further.

Seymour Butz said...

9:05 I am not 11:05 but what I think you are talking about is the fact that marginal cost to deliver another kilowatt hour is greater than the average cost to deliver all the kilowatt hours before it so the new users benefit while the existing ones pay more.

Anonymous said...

"First of all, property taxes are not higher in the richer towns in CT."

I didn't say they were.

I'll try to dumb it down for you- Taxes on a 6000 sq/ft house will be far more then my modest 980 sq/ft house.

Oh and property taxes DO swing to extremes from town to town.

bluecoat said...

I don't get electric service as part of my town property taxes, 9:32.

Wait until the businesses get onto this with their 60% increase. They ain't happy.

Chris MC said...

another substantive thread gang.

it would be easier to follow if the anon posters would make up screen names for themselves - it really can be anything - so your arguments are easier to track...