Wednesday, December 20, 2006

Republicans to Introduce Bill to Ban Trans Fats

From the AP wire:
Two weeks after the New York City Board of Health voted to make the Big Apple the first city in the nation to ban artificial trans fats in restaurant food, two Republican state senators in Connecticut proposed similar legislation Wednesday.
[...]
"By forcing some of the world's largest food chains and restaurateurs to use healthier alternatives in their food preparation, New York City has paved the way for what I hope will be a national movement to improve the health quality of the food we eat in restaurants," said Sen. John McKinney, R-Fairfield.

Sen. Andrew Roraback, R-Goshen, ranking Republican on the legislature's Public Health Committee, co-sponsored the bill. (AP)
So, is this:
A sensible bill that will protect our health
Nanny state-ism
Some sort of ploy
All of the above
Free polls from Pollhost.com
Source
"Connecticut lawmakers hope to ban trans fats in restaurants." Associated Press 20 December, 2006.

22 comments:

GMR said...

I was always sort of opposed to the trans-fat ban, but economist Richard Posner makes a pretty compelling case for their being banned in restaurants.

cgg said...

What no unscientific poll?

Anonymous said...

how 'bout the work on electricity rates
or gas prices (up a penny a day since the election)
they're f_ckin' killin me

easy, lazy, feel good legislation
look who's singing kumbaya, now

DO SOMETING USEFUL, TURDS!

—dad

Anonymous said...

In the spirit of "Karnak the Magnificent":

A: Guns and Butter

Q: What two things do liberal politicians want to seize from your home?

ALittleBitDramatic said...

I'm sure Richard Posner could make a good case for the economics of not banning cyanide in food. It all looks good on paper.

This seems a little intrusive, brought to you by the people the Republican caucus that was so concerned about the school nutrition bill. I don't know enough about the issue to say either way, but it just seems sorta odd coming from Lou DeLuca, et al.

ALittleBitDramatic said...

Despite my distaste for law and economics stuff, however, if Richard Posner can get behind something restrictive like a trans fat ban that's a pretty strong indicator that it's a good idea.

cgg said...

I'd much rather see a bill requiring restaurants to disclose what's actually in their food. No need to ban anything, but they should have nutritional information right there on the menu.

Anonymous said...

influenced by Bloomberg, Bloomberg, Bloomberg!!!!!and the next statewide election. think about it folks.

Anonymous said...

How about a bill to get rid of unsightly waitstaffs?

Eddie said...

cgg, I think I agree with you in principle -- inform consumers and let them make up their own minds -- but menus at Chinese restaurants would start looking like phone books. Not sure how the logistics would play out.

As I follow life's journey from "young and carefree" to "broken-down and cranky," I just don't go to restaurants as much as I used to.

Anonymous said...

cgg- were you a proponent of banning soda in schools? As you may know there are no soda machines in elementary or middle schools anyway, atleast thats been the case in Fairfield for years. The only soda machines in schools in Fairfield are in the high schools (2 as a matter of fact) and they're near the gyms.

I guess the point is that banning trans fats is more aimed at fast food restaurants where its easy for parents to bring young children to eat, cheaply and quickly. This would be another step in that direction of trying to keep kids active and healthy at a young age.

And it may even help lower health care costs over time..

Anonymous said...

Didn't these Republicans oppose the school lunch nutrition bill??

cgg said...

I had mixed feelings about the soda ban. Concerns about obesity didn't bother me, so much as the idea of schools essentially endorsing products. I think marketing to kids and teens in public schools is vile.

And I have mixed feelings about a trans fat ban. I'm not opposed to it, but first I think most adults need to understand what it is the state actually wants to ban. Right now that isn't the case.

Anonymous said...

The School untrition bill and the trans fat ban are two seprate issues. First off the School Nutrition did very little to actually help the problem. A ban on soda in the school was a band-aid for a larger problem. If you want kids and people to be healither then improve the quality of what it is they eat. Banning cookies and soda as a fundraiser only shifts the responisblity of fat kids on too the parents...

the trans fat ban is a bill that actually reqires we all eat healthier.

Anonymous said...

Banning trans fats cookies and soda as a fundraiser only shifts the responisblity of fat kids on too the parents...

face facts: McKinney had a conversion on the road to higher office..he met Mike Bloomberg and his organization would be my guess

Anonymous said...

face facts Scully- your mad that Don Williams got beat to the punch on his road to higher office.

When was the press conference scheduled for, today or tommorow?

Anonymous said...

Anybody got McKinney's home address? I want to mail him some fat. C.O.D.

MikeCT said...

Colin McEnroe talked to Roraback about the proposal on WTIC.

Anonymous said...

Any Republican who cops a Colin interview is obviously the spiritual heir of Nelson Rockefeller.

RINO's will probably never be an endangered species at the State Capitol

Anonymous said...

Everyone should send McKinney and Roraback Fast Food from every place under the sun.

I think Government is budding into people's lives too much.

This is stepping over the line way way too much.

Vic Mackey said...

There only 44 Republicans at the State House They are becoming an endangered species in Hartford.

Shadow said...

This is nanny state foolishness. If trans fats aren't banned by the FDA, then there should be no further restrictions to tell restaurants what foods they can and cannot serve. This is just one more example that the modern Republican party has completely abandoned all libertarian tendencies and is now the arch-enemy of libertarianism.